• Email:
  • Password:
  • Remember Me
 
Print   Subscribe    Share
CDE,MBA,RD
Can't Resist: Just Watched Ms. Paula Use 3 Sticks of Butter in ONE Recipe!!
Section:  General Diabetes

Hello Fellow Bloggers,


Please don't hate me, as I know we've exhausted the "PDD" topic (aka, Paula Deen's Diabetes")....BUT I can't believe what I just watched her make this afternoon while I was working on my PC:


A pineapple dessert pie that contained:


1)  1 stick of butter in the graham cracker crust!

2)  2 sticks of butter in the filling!

3)  Whipped cream on top of the entire pie!


Ugh!  Am I living in the land of nutrition COMMON SENSE

OR

complete NON-SENCE???


Mary Ann Hodorowicz, RD, CDE, MBA, Certified Endocrinology Coder
PresentDiabetes Author of MNT and DSMT Reimbursement Audio Lectures

Eat Well, Laugh Often, Love Much

MEMBER COMMENTS
Re: Can't Resist: Just Watched Ms. Paula Use 3 Sticks of Butter in ONE Recipe!!

Mary Ann,Thanks for pointing out Paula Deene's recent display of cooking style. It doesn't seem to have changed that much.

She is in super denial for sure. Novo Nordisk must be in deep discussion about who decided to give her such a contract. In her interview on Dr Oz, she expressed the thought that she has all these health problems that are being taken care of by the medicine she is taking. She is like many others in this regard who think the medicine takes care of everything so they do not have to change their lifestyle.

Re: Can't Resist: Just Watched Ms. Paula Use 3 Sticks of Butter in ONE Recipe!!

I guess it is all a matter of view.  As a patient, I find this dessert not appropriate for someone with diabetes because of the carbs, not because of the fat.   In my twisted part of the world, good butter is nutritious, far better than soybean oil.  I continue to walk the aisles of my grocery and am appalled at the extensive use of these oils like soybean.  It is almost impossible to find mayo without soybean oil.  If I had to choose between a recipe that used partially hydrogenated soybean oil or butter, there is just no contest. 

I don't eat dishes such as this pineapple dessert pie, but not because of the butter, but because it contains high levels of carbs.  My current favorite butter is KerryGold, made in Ireland from grass fed cattle.  One of my few desserts are Almond cookies made with a whole stick of butter.  Fat is not all bad.

I just personally don't believe that proper nutritional management of diabetes is all about fat restriction, it should really be focused on carb restriction.

Re: Can't Resist: Just Watched Ms. Paula Use 3 Sticks of Butter in ONE Recipe!!

Hi Brain,


I hear what you're saying (and have said) that the focus of a healthy diabetes eating should be carb restriction.


In my opinion, this is just a tad lobsided with the focus so much on carbs.  Yes, we've also exhausted this subject in the past, but for this particular blog thread, I wanted to add this:


A healthy diabetes diet should, in my opinion, consists of multiple nutrition interventions that address the multiple medical abnormalties of the disease of diabetes, and ALSO address a patient's obesity, if he/she is obese (like Ms. Paula). Fat has 9 cal/gm (carb and protein have 4), so the math is straightforward when aiming for weight reduction.


It's actually pretty simple for us, as HCPs, to understand....but not all that simple to apply day in and day out (we've discussed this before also).  So the eating plan really does take the shape of the Mediterrainean diet:


1)  Carb controlled/restricted (we're in agreement here)

2)  Lower total fat.....esp. with obesity and/or high TG

3)  Mostly monounsaturated fat (which butter is not)

4)  Less polyunsatuated fat (soybean oil...we're in agreement here also)

5)  Higher total fiber

6)  Higher soluble fiber

7)  More foods rich in omega 3's

8)  Lean protein in amounts for good health/well-being


Mary Ann Hodorowicz, RD, CDE, MBA, Certified Endocrinology Coder
PresentDiabetes Author of MNT and DSMT Reimbursement Audio Lectures

Eat Well, Laugh Often, Love Much




Re: Can't Resist: Just Watched Ms. Paula Use 3 Sticks of Butter in ONE Recipe!!

I think there is still a continued controversy on the role of fat in weight loss and blood sugar control.  Whether the issue is exhausted or not, remains to be seen.  But we would certainly both agree that a high carb, high fat dessert is not the "core" of a healthy meal either of us would suggest.  At my house, dessert is almost never served and if it is, it is something like greek yogurt with some berries.

ps. I think the term Mediterranean diet is quite problematic.  I've found is no good definition of the diet.  Depending on who you talk to, the diet is either high or low in fat, high or low in saturated, high in carbs or low in carbs, high or low in sodium, etc. I'd like to hear someone explain the core principles of a Mediterranean diet.

Re: Can't Resist: Just Watched Ms. Paula Use 3 Sticks of Butter in ONE Recipe!!

Hi Brian........ask and you shall receive!

Benefits of the Mediterranean Diet

Studies show that following a Mediterranean diet protects against the development of heart disease, metabolic syndrome, some types of cancer, obesity, type 2 diabetes, dementia, Alzheimer’s disease -- and also leads to a longer lifespan.

The health effects of a Mediterranean diet have been studied extensively in the last 10 years, resulting in better science and more clinical evidence.

“There are numerous health benefits, the strongest and most profound evidence is the protection of cardiovascular disease and diabetes,” says Dariush Mozaffarian, MD, DrPH, a researcher, cardiologist, associate professor, and codirector of the cardiovascular epidemiology program at Harvard School of Public Health.

Health benefits are not attributed to diet alone; it is the whole package, which includes the lifestyle of the people who live along theMediterranean.

What Is a Mediterranean Diet?

There is no single Mediterranean diet. Instead, each region across Europe -- fromSpainto theMiddle East-- customizes the basic diet to take advantage of food availability and cultural preferences.

Similarities include a reliance on plant foods such as vegetables, fruits, beans, whole grains, nuts, olives, and olive oil along with some cheese, yogurt, fish, poultry, eggs, and wine. These foods form the basis of the plan and provide thousands of micronutrients, antioxidants, vitamins, minerals, and fiber that work together to protect against chronic disease.

Most of the foods on the plan are fresh, seasonal whole foods- they're not processed. Preparation methods tend to be simple; foods are rarely deep-fried.

Only small amounts of saturated fat, sodium, sweets, and meat are part of the plan.

The Mediterranean lifestyle also includes leisurely dining and regular physical activity, which are an important part of the equation.

Olive oil is what most people associate with a Mediterranean-type diet. But it's not just any olive oil; it needs to be extra virgin.  

“It may not be the monounsaturated fat as much as it is the phytochemicals and compounds in the extra virgin olive oil that offers the health benefits,” Mozaffarian says.

"There is no good evidence that monounsaturated fats alone are protective for cardiovascular disease," Mozaffarian says. "Instead, it is the lifestyle and all the foods together that are so favorable."

Mediterranean Diet Benefits

The Mediterranean diet has long been associated with a low risk of heart disease.

For instance, the PREDIMED study compared the Mediterranean diet to a low-fat diet, and found the Mediterranean diet has more beneficial effects on cardiovascular risk factors.

And in March 2011, an analysis of 50 studies linked the Mediterranean diet to lower odds of getting metabolic syndrome, which is a cluster of risk factors (high BP, high blood sugar, unhealthy cholesterol level and abdominal fat) that make heart disease, diabetes, and stroke more likely.

Other studies suggest that -- along with maintaining a healthy body weight --  one of the best strategies to lower diabetes risk is to eat a Mediterranean-type diet that's rich in plant foods; low in red meat, meat products, high-fat dairy, and refined grains; and includes a moderate amount of alcohol (mainly red wine).

Besides all the other health benefits, there may also be a weight advantage. Research makes it clear: Being physically active and eating a nutritious diet made up mainly of whole foods that are filling and satisfying can help people lose weight.

General principles

The Mediterranean Diet is not about quick fix 'superfoods', beloved of food writers. Nor is it a strict list of prohibitions preventing occasional excess. Rather, the Mediterranean Diet is a formula for healthy day-to-day eating over the long term. Here's a quick guide for those who'd like to dip their toes into the warm, blue waters of a Mediterranean diet:

  1. Maximize your intake of vegetables, legumes, fruits and whole grain cereals.
  2. Limit your red meat intake - fish and poultry are healthy substitutes.
  3. Where possible, use mono-unsaturated olive oil or rapeseed oil in place of animal fat such as butter or lard.
  4. Limit your intake of highly processed 'fast foods' and 'ready meals', where you cannot tell saturated fat and salt intake.
  5. Eat no more than moderate amounts of dairy products, and preferably low-fat ones.
  6. Do not add salt to your food at the table - there is already plenty there.
  7. Snack on fruit, dried fruit and unsalted nuts rather than cakes, crisps and biscuits.
  8. Drink (red) wine during meals, but no more than three small glasses per day if you are a man and no more than two small glasses per day if you are a woman.
  9. Water is the best 'non-alcoholic beverage' (as opposed to sugary drinks), although health benefits have also been claimed for various teas and coffee (see Note 3

Adopting a strict Mediterranean diet

Scientific research has shown that the closer individuals can get to the 'ideal' Mediterranean Diet, outlined in the pyramid chart below, the greater the health advantage in that, the benefit of adopting the whole dietary pattern exceeds the summated health-giving properties of its individual components.

 

  SEE NEXT BLOG FOR GRAPHIC OF MEDITERRANEAN PYRAMID

References 

(1) Food and diet, NHS Choices

(2) The Mediterranean Diet: Constituents and Health Promotion by Antonia-Leda Matalas, Antonis Zampelas, Vassilis Stavrinos, Ira Wolinsky. Published by CRC Press, 2003. ISBN 0849301106, 9780849301100

(3) Dietary Guidelines for adults in Greece. Ministry of Health and Welfare; in Archives of Hellenic Medicine 1999, 16(5): 516-524

(4) Willett WC, Sacks F, Trichopoulou A, et al; Mediterranean diet pyramid: a cultural model for healthy eating. Am J Clin Nutr. 1995 Jun;61(6 Suppl):1402S-1406S. [abstract]

(5) Trichopoulou A, Vasilopoulou E, Georga K; Macro- and micronutrients in a traditional Greek menu. Forum Nutr. 2005;(57):135-46. [abstract]

(6) Sofi F, Cesari F, Abbate R, et al; Adherence to Mediterranean diet and health status: meta-analysis. BMJ. 2008 Sep 11;337:a1344. doi: 10.1136/bmj.a1344. [abstract]

(7) The Mediterranean Diet: A total diet and lifestyle approach continues to be one of the best prescriptions for a long, healthy life. Kathleen M. Zelman, MPH, RD, LD, WebMD Expert Column

 


Mary Ann Hodorowicz, RD, CDE, MBA, Certified Endocrinology Coder
PresentDiabetes Author of MNT and DSMT Reimbursement Audio Lectures

 

Eat Well, Laugh Often, Love Much


Re: Can't Resist: Just Watched Ms. Paula Use 3 Sticks of Butter in ONE Recipe!!

The discussion never ends...

Below is an interesting link from Dr. Eades blog yesterday.

It includes a TEDx talk (± 17 minutes) by a physician who is using diet to reverse her very serious health issues.

Dr. Eades is also one to point out the folly of those physicians and nutrtion experts suffering from Lipophobia although not in this particular blog.

http://www.proteinpower.com/drmike/?p=4828

Like Brian and many others I avoid all soy products and since most commercially available  mayo seems to have soy oils included I make our own with olive oil.

Now recent revelations have been made that even the "Extra virgin" olive oil is adulterated.

Guess if there is $$$ to be made exploiting the masses in the food aisles of the local grocery store this will continue unabated and supported by the multiple nutrition councils, panels of "experts" etc. ad nausea and taken for "Gospel."

-- 
Bruce W. Miller, Ph.D.
Re: Can't Resist: Just Watched Ms. Paula Use 3 Sticks of Butter in ONE Recipe!!

Bruce,


I'm not sure what part or sub-part of nutrition you are referring to in this statement:


Guess if there is $$$ to be made exploiting the masses in the food aisles of the local grocery store this will continue unabated and supported by the multiple nutrition councils, panels of "experts" etc. ad nausea and taken for "Gospel."


Can you clarify?


Mary Ann Hodorowicz

Re: Can't Resist: Just Watched Ms. Paula Use 3 Sticks of Butter in ONE Recipe!!

Bruce,


I'm not sure what part or sub-part of nutrition you are referring to in this statement:


Guess if there is $$$ to be made exploiting the masses in the food aisles of the local grocery store this will continue unabated and supported by the multiple nutrition councils, panels of "experts" etc. ad nausea and taken for "Gospel."


Can you clarify?


Mary Ann Hodorowicz

Re: Can't Resist: Just Watched Ms. Paula Use 3 Sticks of Butter in ONE Recipe!!

I was suggesting too many of the "highly recommended" healthy diets are based on the low fat, high fiber and loads of grains and when correlated to the obesity crisis it seems clear that cutting the fat and substituting grains, corn sugars and all the inexpensive ingredients in place of more costly real food items, industry profits while the masses continue to develop health issues.

 

 

 

Re: Can't Resist: Just Watched Ms. Paula Use 3 Sticks of Butter in ONE Recipe!!

 Bruce, per your comment:


"I was suggesting too many of the "highly recommended" healthy diets are based on the low fat, high fiber and loads of grains and when correlated to the obesity crisis it seems clear that cutting the fat and substituting grains, corn sugars and all the inexpensive ingredients in place of more costly real food items, industry profits while the masses continue to develop health issues."


I'd like to offer another perspective, which is the opposite of your's" 


What is recommended my HCPs, experts, scientists, researchers, etc. (e.g., low fat, whole grains, high fiber) does NOT mean people will follow it!  


In my opinion, the obesity crisis is NOT due to the masses adhering to a low fat, whole grain, high fiber diet.  


What most obese people ARE adhering is a HIGH fat, HIGH sugar, LOW fiber, non-whole grain diet!


That's my story and I'm sticking to it!


 

Mary Ann Hodorowicz, RD, CDE, MBA, Certified Endocrinology Coder
PresentDiabetes Author of MNT and DSMT Reimbursement Audio Lectures

Eat Well, Laugh Often, Love Much






Re: Can't Resist: Just Watched Ms. Paula Use 3 Sticks of Butter in ONE Recipe!!

Mary Ann,

Is it fair to say that if you believe that obesity is caused by "High fat, high sugar, low fiber and too few whole grains," then a better diet would be "Low fat, low sugar, high fiber, more whole grains."  I think there would be general agreement with the low sugar and high fiber.  However, fat reduction is considered by many to be lacking evidence and recommending that people add whole grains (and hence carbs) is perhaps not what you actually intended to say.

I actually am somewhat soft on the whole fat thing.  I think there is evidence that a high fat diet in conjunction with a high carb diet leads to weight gain.  But a high fat diet with a low carb diet seems to actually be quite good, not only for weight, but for lipids.  So in that sense, you are entirely right, 3 sticks of butter in a high carb dessert is not good.  But it isn't the butter that is inherently a problem, it is the carbs.

Re: Can't Resist: Just Watched Ms. Paula Use 3 Sticks of Butter in ONE Recipe!!

Brian, I think we are going to agree to diagree.


For weight gain and weight loss, the math is straightforward: fat has 9 cal/gm, whereas carbs and protein have 4.    Also, then, when protein and carb is higher in fat, the calories increase proportionately.


And then there is the difference is in how excess calories are stored:


 

Excess carbohydrate calories must be converted to triglycerides before they can be stored as body fat. This process requires over 25% of the energy stored in the food. Thus, if you took in 100 calories of pure carbohydrate in excess of your body's needs, you'd only store about 75 calories worth of fat, since you used up some of the energy in the conversion process.


 

Fat, on the other hand, is fat to begin with. It only takes about 3% of the energy in it to put it up on the larder shelf, as it were. Thus, 100 calories from fat in excess of your body's needs can end up as 97 calories worth of "fat stored on the hips"!


Does anyone else want to "weigh in" on this?


 

Mary Ann Hodorowicz, RD, CDE, MBA, Certified Endocrinology Coder
PresentDiabetes Author of MNT and DSMT Reimbursement Audio Lectures

 

Eat Well, Laugh Often, Love Much




Re: Can't Resist: Just Watched Ms. Paula Use 3 Sticks of Butter in ONE Recipe!!

I think we can just agree to disagree.  I don't believe in calories in/calories out.  I am a fan of Gary Taubes and his book "Why we get fat."  I have come to believe that it is really about insulin.  Fat without an insulin response does not lead to weight gain and it doesn't lead to lipid abnormalities.

I appreciate your willingness to discuss this and I also wish more of your colleagues would weigh in.

Re: Can't Resist: Just Watched Ms. Paula Use 3 Sticks of Butter in ONE Recipe!!

Hi Brian...again!  

OK, I took your bait re: Gary Taubes.  Since I did not read his books, I did some digging online, and found this VERY interesting critique of Gary's take on what makes people fat (as you know, Gary is a strong proponent of the high fat, high protein, low carb "Atkin's" style diet):

 

Thin Body of Evidence: Why I Have Doubts about Gary Taubes’s Why We Get Fat

When someone divides a complex phenomenon into two basic categories, he invariably oversimplifies and distorts reality.


Gary Taubes, a scientific journalist whacks scientists with more gusto than Gary, whom I’ve known for 15 years. Gary, who earned his degree in physics and was briefly—and tellingly—an amateur boxer, began his career thumping physicists.

Gary’s career really took off when he switched his focus from physics to a topic that the masses actually care about: diet. Garyraised doubts about the claim that low-salt diets are healthy. In a 2002 cover story for The New York Times Magazine, Gary questioned the truism that people are getting fatter because they eat too much—especially fatty foods—and exercise too little. Carbohydrates,Gary contended, have fueled the epidemic of obesity in the U.S.; cut the carbs and you can eat all the fat and protein you like, just as the controversial diet doctor Robert Atkins has insisted for decades.

 

I have great respect for Gary. He’s a science journalist’s science journalist, who researches topics to the point of obsession—actually, well beyond that point—and never dumbs things down for readers. Gary marshals mountains of data in support of his thesis, but I still have misgivings about it. My reaction is partly visceral; the Atkins diet—which prescribes little fruit and vegetables and lots of meat—strikes me as, well, gross. Here is Gary’s personal diet, as described on his blog:

 

"I do indeed eat three eggs with cheese, bacon and sausage for breakfast every morning, typically a couple of cheeseburgers (no bun) or a roast chicken for lunch, and more often than not, a rib eye or New York steak (grass fed) for dinner, usually in the neighborhood of a pound of meat. I cook with butter and, occasionally, olive oil (the sausages). My snacks run to cheese and almonds. So lots of fat and saturated fat and very little carbohydrates."

 

Gary, it seems to me, applies his critical outlook more to high-carb, low-fat diets than to the Atkins diet, which he celebrates for helping him and many others lose weight "almost effortlessly." If the Atkins diet works so well, why hasn’t it swept aside its competitors, especially low-calorie, low-fat diets recommended by Weight Watchers and other popular groups?


One problem, Gary says, is that many people become addicted to carbs, and their craving makes them fall off the Atkins wagon. Switching from a high-carb, low-fat diet to the Atkins system, Gary also acknowledges in Why We Get Fat, can trigger "weakness, fatigue, nausea, dehydration, diarrhea, constipation," among other side effects.Gary assures readers that they’ll reap the benefits if they just stick to Atkins, but he slams advocates of less-fat, more-exercise diets for giving people this same just-stick-to-it advice.

 

Because Gary cites his personal experience at weight loss following the high fat, high protein, very low carb diet as evidence, I can cite mine as counterevidence. I’m six feet, one inch tall. I eat lots of carbs, including pasta, bread, rice, potatoes, cookies, cake, pie and three teaspoons of sugar in coffee at least twice a day. I weigh 170 pounds.Gary says that I’m just one of those lucky folks whose genes let them chow down carbs without getting fat.


Here is another more significant exception: Many Asian people consume lots of carbs, especially rice, without getting fat. Well, Gary says, that’s because these Asians don’t ingest as much highly processed sugar—contained in soft drinks, for example—as Americans do. But then why not just cut out these sugary foods instead of almost all carbs? Gary seems to recommend this course in a New York Times Magazine cover story published in April, "Is Sugar Toxic?".

 

But now we’re moving away from the dramatic, celebratory claim that the Atkins diet solves obesity to a more complex perspective: For many people high-carb diets are fine, and the low-carb Atkins diet isn’t; different diets work for different people.

 

Reviewing Why We Get Fat in The New York Times, Abigail Zuger, a physician, notes that "in virtually all head-to-head comparisons of various diet plans, the average long-term results have invariably been quite similar—mediocre all around." Given the "remarkable diversity of the human organism," she adds, "it is foolish to expect a single diet to serve all comers."   Zuger’s take seems reasonable to me.

 

Toward the end of our Bloggingheads interview, I asked Gary about his family’s diet. He answered cagily, but he implied that his wife has resisted putting their two kids on Atkins. I think that’s sensible, and Gary, when in his critical rather than celebratory mode, probably does, too.


Although he insists that the evidence for his diet claims is overwhelming, he acknowledges in an author’s note to Why We Get Fat that the claims still need to be "rigorously tested."


So, when Gary divides diets into two basic categories—the Atkins diet, which is good, and all other diets, which are bad—he’s oversimplifying and distorting reality. But read his new book with a critical eye, check out my Bloggingheads interview with him and make up your own mind.

 

Mary Ann Hodorowicz, RD, CDE, MBA, Certified Endocrinology Coder
PresentDiabetes Author of MNT and DSMT Reimbursement Audio Lectures

Eat Well, Laugh Often, Love Much